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In our blog, you’ll find information about metaphysics and spirituality from Lazaris and Jach, excerpts from Lazaris recordings and interviews, and travelogues from Jach’s adventures around the world.


Hope is the Secret

Monday, March 30, 2020
Blog: Hope is the Secret

... Herbs, tiny carrots, green beans, and lettuces, all from our garden.
 
Enrique and I are quarantined in the countryside here in Colombia. We are healthy, secure, and safe. We are away from the city because the potentials of violence are more real in Colombia than in California. The virus is here in Colombia. It came late, but it’s now here, and the fears that come with it are expanded because of the still developing nation status of Colombia.

We had planned to go back to California for the March events of course, and when they were postponed until December, we thought we’d go back anyway. Yes, we’ll go; no we’ll stay. No we’re going to go anyway; no definitely we are staying here. A doctor friend had told us of that soon no one would be allowed in or out of Colombia and that lockdowns were coming for the States and for Colombia. With that news our final decision was easy.

All this happened on the eve of a long holiday weekend here. The Governor of our state, Valle de Cauca, called for a curfew during the long weekend as a way to keep people home and away from large celebratory gatherings. A few other Governors and the Mayor of Bogotá did the same. However the Colombian President, perhaps angry that they went ahead without letting him make a national decree, cancelled the curfews say that “social distancing was absurd.” Sadly a familiar cry by some others who claim to be leaders. However, the Governors and Mayors countermanded the President with an outcry of support from the people.

Curfew in place, it was followed by a nationwide lockdown. We had prepared for the four day curfew, but then we had to scramble to prepare for three week lockdown. Thousands of Colombians had to scramble too. However, a country that seems to thrive on chaos, handled the situation well. We loaded up one car with the dogs, their supplies, and with Enrique’s dialysis machine with its many supplies. Another car was overloaded with our stuff. Then we were off to the country.

We were worried though. There was a deadline time for leaving the city and we were late. Of course. [s] We might be stopped and turned back or fined or both. We worked a bit of magic and we headed out. The otherwise gridlocked road was almost free of cars, trucks, and people. We moved quickly coming to and then driving past two potential military check points. We reached the final curve in the main road and our turnoff was just ahead. As we turned from the paved road to the open road (narrow dirt road with its share of ruts and boulders) we looked ahead. The military check point was about 100 yards beyond our turn off. Magic was afoot. We will be here until Easter at least. There is talk of extending the quarantine for those over 70 or even for everyone.

These are painful times and tragic times and the days are rife with fear, and people are dying and people are loosing everything and people are getting lost. The dark and darkening chaos exacerbates the situation threatening the unspeakable of the unknown or of an abyss. In the mire of darkness, of pain, tragedy and fear, I think of what Lazaris said in South Africa: He said that we stood on a pinnacle and that things were about to get worse. Where and how we stepped from that pinnacle were crucial. He added what I thought was an aside: Things are about to get much worse. I also think about what Lazaris said as the Vermont days were concluding: It’s time to be the Sentinel, the Champion, and the Guardian that we always have planned to be and that we are destined to be.

So I am being conscious of where I step and how I step. Where? Into the chaos. How? With resolve.

I am stepping into the dark and then into the darkest parts of that chaos and in that depth, I am looking for the light. It’s there. Simply said, I found that light in the beauty and in the love. The dark chaos is neither beautiful or loving; this novel virus is not beautiful and it’s not loving. But in the darkest chaos, and I think it has to be the chaos beyond the dark and darker, the chaos that is the darkest, there is hope. Not the hope of desperation or last resort, and not my hope. In that darkest chaos, there is the shimmering hope that is a reflection of the soul and spirit of humankind. It’s not the hope that any of us can muster. It’s beyond what we can create. Luminous hope? Divine hope? Yeah.

Oh, such a cliche, right? It can be that and it can be no more than a platitude, and when we argue for our limitations, we get them. I don’t know what that hope should be called. Maybe luminous and divine smack too much of cliche or platitude. Maybe it’s “hope without a name,” hope beyond our imaginations and beliefs, maybe it’s “unfathomable hope.” Whatever we might choose to call it or not call it, it’s there.

And this hope is beauty, and is love. Not beautiful and loving, it’s beauty and it’s love. And I know without the need for certainty, that this shimmering hope is there in the darkest recesses of the chaos of this virus. It is waiting to be found.

I also feel that this hope is the secret to the healing that Covid-19 is calling for. Healing doesn’t always fix things and return them to the ways they were. Healing changes things and offers the opportunity to make things anew. I feel that this hope-beauty-love shimmering light is at the core of healing the devastation of the Coronavirus and at the core what we need for the growing and changing in which we and our world are involved.

So we will wash the vegetables from our garden. We will stay healthy and safe, and we will work our magic.


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A Decade is Ending

Thursday, January 2, 2020
Blog: A Decade is Ending

A Decade is Ending . . .

A decade is ending. That’s not too exciting; it happens every ten years. But as this decade ends I am caught up in I don’t know what. Nostalgia, curiosity, wonderment, mystery, I don’t know, but whatever it is, it’s a nagging feeling that demands my attention.

Lazaris has often called the first two decades of the new millennium, “the two most exciting decades in the history of humankind on Earth.” The 1990s was the most monumental but these two are the most exciting.

I have found that Lazaris says some of the most significant things in what seems the simplest ways. For example, I often think back to one among the many culminating weekends called Earth Changes. It was from a dozen years ago. Lazaris talked of how we were standing on a pinnacle; he spoke again of our pinnacle in the last few months of this year. During that weekend Lazaris spoke about a future of so many things that seemed farfetched and unbelievable, and yet we are experiencing and living them now: increased threats of terrorism, “terrorism blackmail,” national and global economic fragility — an economic “house of cards,” genuine threats of climate change, and a war of civility in the United States. It’s chilling.

Against that backdrop, I think of the simple phrase: The most exciting decades in the history ... What does that mean?
I don’t think the coming years will be without excitement; they certainly won’t be dull. I don’t think there will be less chaos or less turbulence. Probably more. In the future there may be decades that will replace these two as the most exciting, but I think something or many things have happened in the last 20 years that are beyond our capacity to evaluate and beyond our capacity to understand. It feels to me that there are small things, things that to us seem insignificant or even silly, that in time, will have profound impact on us and on the worlds we create. Profound impact, impact that ripples to the edges of space-time. I feel it; I feel it in my bones.

I think about smart phones and the internet and economic development in Asia and 3-D printing and the virtual middle class and expanding scientific revelations and growing social media and shifting global power and autocracy and climate change and cultural memes and baby boomers and millennials and somewhere in the mix, somewhere in the chaos, something magical is happening that I don’t understand — that I can’t possibly understand — and that I don’t and can’t understand doesn’t matter. It’s happening. And it’s happening big.

I think that something that is still hiding in all the chaos and turbulence and violent and injustice is why these are the two most exciting decades in the history of humankind on Earth. We just don’t know it yet.

I am willing to have that be that way, and I am going to create it that way. As I leave this year and this decade behind, I look to 2020, but more importantly, I look to the coming new decade. What we are creating is more than a year can hold; it’s more than a decade can hold. But I look to the decade until I can look farther.

And of this third decade of the millennium? I am not waiting for its name or its fate. Rather than waiting, instead, I’m choosing and I’m deciding. For me, this new year is going to be the beginning of a decade of satisfaction. Not of complacency or of settling, but a decade of fulfillment. Undaunted by the chaos, 2020 is the first year of a decade of creating and fulfilling my wishes, desires, and dreams. It’s the initiating year that inspires and sparks clearer visions — 2020 visions — of my newer new world.

And there was something that happened during these first two decades of the new millennium, maybe in the last few years, that makes them the most exciting in our history. I just know it.

Now to me, that’s thrilling and exhilarating. Beautiful.

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Hope

Sunday, December 20, 2015
Blog: Hope

By Jach

A Grouping of Questions with Jach's Replies from the Online Conferences

During the Evenings with Jach and the "Twenty Questions" Conferences as well, so many have commented about Jach's wisdom and insight. He connects current events to Lazaris' teachings in a way that helps bring new and refreshing outlooks to so many issues in our world. Because of the overwhelming feedback we have received, we have grouped together some of Jach's answers by topic. Enjoy!

Hope

Q: Can you provide your thoughts on the Tucson event this past weekend? It has multiple meanings and metaphors, but I'd like your reflections.

JACH:

Well, at first I was shocked and appalled, and then I turned to understanding, or to working with understanding, and I have come around to once again being appalled. At first my shock had to do with such an act of violence happening at a shopping center in a place such as Tucson. (I have been there ... once [s].) Then I wondered if this were political. I wondered if this guy, with mental problems and all, had hooked into the segment of the Tea Party that advocates "take them down" or having someone "in our targets." I now am hoping that this guy had no knowledge of that kind of stuff and that he was just part of some obscure lunatic fringe. I am hoping that this was not at all political, not at all. Even so, I am still appalled: This is America. These sorts of things don't happen in America.

The polarization that Lazaris has mentioned stands out here. The lack of imagination and the lack of dreaming leads to instant polarization, Lazaris pointed out in November. We are seeing that now. I do not speak of this with any political bias (and personally, I surely do have a lot of political bias [s]), but I leave that aside now). The issue of an imagination that is lacking and perhaps even dying, and of a lack of dreams, crosses all political terrain. And I think it has a strong connection with a growing sense that can be called a lack of future. I think so many people just do not have a sense that there is a future or the future they see is abysmal. Some tie that to politics: The left says the right is leading us into devastation and the right says the left is leading us off a cliff into oblivion, but such rhetoric is symptomatic of a larger issue, it seems to me. People, left, right, or in any other direction, seem to lack a sense of the future or of a positive future. And I think this is connected to the Tucson shooting. This guy having no sense of the future tried to what? Kill the future of a governmental official? A judge? Innocent people? Why? He had no future. Perhaps he was showing them that they have no future. He created that for 6 people and he significantly altered his future and the future of all who attended (to varying degrees).

We need hope. We need the expectations and anticipations; we need the presence of soul and spirit that are hope. And out of that sense of hope, new dreams can be born. And out of that sense of hope, new futures can form. Initiation is not enough. We need to fuel what we set in motion with hope. I think back to 2000, the Year of Dominion, and to 2001, the Year of Mystery. The terrain of dominion is made fertile by the insemination of mystery. The womb of dominion needs the insemination of mystery to give birth to creation and manifestation. Well, this decade began with 2010: The Year of Initiation. But setting things in motion, causing them to be, is not enough. We need to fuel the initiations with hope so that which is set in motion, rich with hope, can emerge as enchantment. I see a pattern here. And I see Tucson calling us to that pattern. Yesterday Gabby (I think it's beautiful that people are calling her Gabby) opened her eyes. In the midst of this horror: hope. What a gift she gives us all.

Then there are President Obama's comments. Oh man, can we come together? Perhaps we magicians can. He spoke of the tendency to blame and point fingers. He spoke of how we want to know why. We want reasons for the unreasonable. He spoke of how we have choice in how we react and how we respond. I doubt that some such as Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck will quiet their rhetoric, but they are entertainers: They have an audience to please and they are putting on a show. But for us who are magicians, for us who are mapmakers, I think we can come together. Not in form -- I am not talking about coming together in form. But we can come together in function. I am appalled that it happened, and I am determined to find the hope and to augment and embellish the hope in this tragedy.

Q: When Lazaris talks to us about emptying ourselves of all Hope that has been, he also says "not hopeless, but devoid of Hope. I get it when I am in meditation and can do it, but wonder how you would cognitively describe it?

JACH:

Lazaris talks of the Paradox of Hope. Actually, he talked of it years and years ago in the 1990s, I believe, when he first talked of hope. [s] The paradox, as you point out is that you need to let go of all hope, all of it, in order to receive hope. That is, you need to release it all in order to receive its bounty ... Ah, the bounty of hope and then the magic of hope. In a sense, we have to make room for it by discarding all the hope we have. Lazaris also points out: Not hopeless, but devoid of hope. I love the next part.

You say you get it in meditation, but outside of meditation, how do you describe it? I am not sure you can cognitively describe it in the conscious state. It is a paradox: to have it you have to discard it. You have to be willing to be without hope, not hopeless but without hope. And hope is a transcendent energy. We cannot fully describe or fully comprehend hope, and I suspect we cannot cognitively describe it, either.

So with that as a backdrop, an analogy: I can take off my shoes and be shoeless. But there are those who have lost their shoes or who never had them. So maybe when I discard my shoes, I am devoid of shoes, but not shoeless. I will get my shoes back shortly, but for those who truly lost their shoes? Okay, okay, it's not a perfect analogy. Not perfect? Hey, it's not even a good analogy, but maybe it works.

A hopeless person has no hope, but they do not or cannot take responsibility for its absence. To relinquish hope, to be without hope but not hopeless, means that I can hope, and I can have it again. I am responsible for relinquishing it.

One step more: To be without hope, but not hopeless, is possible because "hopeless" is not a quantity, it is a state of mind and a state of being. It is a quality. When I relinquish my hope, I still maintain a hopeful state of mind and state of being. I just don't hold on to any hope at the moment.
I hope [s] that answers your question in some way.

Q: It is interesting to me that Hope and Trust are linked at that 4th position of the upper Tier of Emotions. Can you please speak to how you see those two energies working together.

JACH:

I think trust is an anchor for hope. Lazaris points out that hope can be a miraculous gift, and hope can also be cruel. I was surprised by that comment, so I thought about it more. Yes. Hope can be false hope. It can be a delusion. It can be clinging to something that isn't or that will never be. We can hope and hope and hope and do nothing or little else, and our reality and our world can be devastated and devastating, but we just sit there hoping and hoping and hoping. ...
Hope can be bitterly cruel and ugly. The abused wife or husband comes back one more time hoping things will be different this time. The broken-hearted who clings to the hope that he or she will come back ... waiting for the ghostly lover, hoping. I hadn't put that together. I had only thought of hope as this wondrous, magical thing -- which it can be.

So what makes a true hope, a luminous hope, where otherwise a false or cruel hope might be? I think trust is a key. It is not the only key, I think, but I think it is an important one. And when I say that, I don't mean that we need to trust what we are hoping for. (Maybe that's true, too, but that's not what I am thinking about now.) I think we need to be trustworthy. I think we need to be someone that others can trust -- worthy of another's trust. And I think we have to be one who is willing to trust others, others who have demonstrated that they are worth trusting. So I think we need to be conscious of our rapport with trust, and that we need a working relationship (a relationship that works) with trust. When we are trustworthy and we trust, I think we can release our hold on hopes that could be cruel. I think we can release false hope, delusionary hopes, and hopes that are excuses to hold on to stuff we need to let go of. So such hopes are going to be there. Our negative ego can present them. Others can encourage them. But if we are trustworthy and if we trust, I think we can sort and sift through those potentially cruel hopes.

That's one aspect. Another aspect is that it takes strength to hope, to genuinely hope. Lazaris has pointed out that the consensus reality is distrustful of hope. Hope is seen as an emotion of last resort. When all else has failed, the only thing left is hope. That's what's sadly true for many people in the world. When someone says, "Well, we are hopeful. All we can do is hope," they are describing a really bad situation. To overcome the resonance of the consensus reality and to truly lean upon and rest upon hope ... that takes strength, a trusting and enduring strength, it seems to me.

The word, hope, is an easy one to say. We hope a lot ... We hope people are happy, we hope they are satisfied, we hope they drop dead [s], we hope for positive things and we hope for negative things for almost everyone. The word slips out of our mouths easily. But can we truly hope? Do we work with hope, really? I know I have a great deal to learn about working with hope. I say it a lot. I value hope. I appreciate it. I get inspired by it. I get goose bumps, and I get all teary-eyed when I think of its beauty and its wonder (and its power and potency). But I know very little of hope, of the real deal of the genuinely powerful, magical thing that is hope. ... Primordial Hope, Luminous Hope, Human Hope ... the Glamoury and the Majesty of Hope. I think trust is a part of it. AND I think that the two (trust and hope) may be two very different things, but that they share the same resonance. They function at the same frequency there in the middle or the 4th position -- in that upper tier. They are the most determined, and they are essential for happiness. As alike or as different as they may be, they are key and essential for love.

Q: I am wondering, with all the energies of hope, if there is anything we can do on a daily basis to boost hope in ourselves and keep our resonance high and clear.

JACH:

Oh, there are so many things we can do. [s] I cannot remember the title of the recording, but it's on Hope and Joy, and it was an Evening recording from a few years back. If you go to the shopping cart and do a search, the exact title will come up. [Editor's Note: The recording is "The Incredible Magic of Hope and Joy."] On that recording Lazaris suggests several techniques. One is an Elixir of Hope. It's very nice. Another is a technique to work with Seven Days of Hope. It is stunningly amazing. For seven days, you focus on hope. You focus on listening to your Soul and Spirit. You focus on expressing your expectations and observing your anticipations. Lazaris points out that we use the words "expectation" and "anticipation" interchangeably, and that's okay. But they are different. Anticipation is our actions or behaviors in advance of an event. Our expectations are our feelings and images after an event. Anticipation is masculine energy, and expectation is feminine energy.

Even though we use the words interchangeably, it is helpful to track our anticipations. What do we do and how do we behave in advance of an expected event? And it is valuable to track our expectations, the feelings and images we hold after the event. We can work to lift each. We can work to allow each to be alive with light. They can be luminous. When our anticipations and our expectations are luminous, we are alive with hope. Our hope is luminous. We can flow that light -- that luminous hope -- into our reality and into the world.

During one of the recent two One-Day events, we worked with Igniting the Embers of Hope. It is beautiful. It is powerful. In the other, we take those embers of hope to the Weaver Woman and together weave a Tapestry of Hope. Those two meditations are luminous. And I truly know the world is and that it can be different because of the work that we can do with luminous hope. We can also work with a Journal of Hope. Write down your hopes: desires, dreams, visions (passive hope) and your ideas, plans, and projects (active hope). Put them together as magic papers ... a 3" square, one for each hope. Fold those papers with intention and attention. Focus. [s] Then put them in a "Hope Chest," a box or a bowl, and let them incubate. You can also work with a crystal that is a Purveyor of Hope or one that has an Incubation Chamber. Or, you can work with a crystal that you choose and from which you get permission, and that crystal can be your Hope Amplifier. Work with the Hope Chest or Hope Amplifier, a box (or bowl), or a crystal. Place the slips of paper under or around the crystal. You can infuse your day with hope. And, perhaps, what is even more exciting and rewarding, you can infuse the world with hope.

But watch out! [s] Hope is the initiator. It will set things in motion and cause things to be. It is immensely powerful. Immensely. And it is beautiful in the hands of a magician. So have fun with hope. Okay? Thanks for asking. [s] You have sparked some ideas in me. I hope I have sparked some in you.

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