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In our blog, you’ll find information about metaphysics and spirituality from Lazaris and Jach, excerpts from Lazaris recordings and interviews, and travelogues from Jach’s adventures around the world.


Creativity as the Current We Came In On and One We Will Return On & Working with Creativity and Passion

Saturday, December 19, 2015
Blog: Creativity as the Current We Came In On and One We Will Return On & Working with Creativity and Passion

By Jach

A Grouping of Questions with Jach's Replies from the Online Conferences

Q: In a recording from a Sunday afternoon, Unlocking Creativity, Lazaris spoke of creativity as the current we came in on and the one we will return on, as well. He also mentions imagination as the most powerful component of creativity. How does this tie in with the Imaginal Realm and with the current we are now returning on? Thank You, Jach.

Jach: Hi there. Good to hear from you. I know you have worked with the Imaginal Realm before but this last weekend was so incredible. You would have had a great time. [s]

There is a strong connection between these different threads and they are strongly interwoven. Lazaris talked a bit about this during the workshop. Creativity is a flow of energy that has distinct force. Yet to become a usable energy and force in our world, it has to be modulated or "down stepped" in the generation of that energy. It needs resistance to condense into a perceivable and usable energy.

In our world, we are told that creation -- the product of creativity -- is born of necessity or chance. These schools of thought are well established and well laid out. They are as institutions in our world. As a result of that, when we experience creativity, we link it to necessity or we link it to chance. Those are the poles in our world of duality around which creativity condenses and precipitates into creative energy and manifestation.

In the Imaginal Realm there is the creativity that is born of necessity. There is also the creativity that is born of chance. But there is also a creativity that is born of itself that does not require necessity or chance in order to exist and in order to be viable. I think it is that creativity -- the one that creates itself sans necessity and without chance that is the creativity that we came in on. I think that is the energy that is not modulated by necessity/chance, that is the most powerful and the most real, especially beyond the limits and bounds of space-time.

Now, within the creative process, imagination is key. Technique is important. Developing the craft of artistry to the level of mastery is key, there is no question. But if that creativity, no matter how sharp or well honed, lacks imagination, what is it? Replicative, at best. Cameras can do that. Creativity that is only imaginative lacking skill and technique can be entertaining in the moment, but it is seldom long lasting and never is classic. Or at least that's how it seems to me.

So imagination is the most critical and the most important or valuable key. In our world, we are told imagination is make-believe and false. It's interesting how the two are so automatically linked, isn't it? Beyond "just imagination," psychology uses active imagination but limits it to a therapy technique. And Lazaris talks of a living imagination that is very different than the "just" and the "active" imaginations.

But in the Imaginal Realm, there is an imagination that is beyond a living one. That is, just as creativity is connected to necessity and to chance, so imagination, even a living one, is connected to passion and desire, to logic and reason, to our body and our compassion, and to our images and our inspiration. Well, in the Imaginal Realm there is imagination that imagines itself. It doesn't rely upon our desires, passions, logic, reason, etc ... It doesn't need us. It exists and creates -- imagines -- itself. Here is the tie in. Creativity that imagines itself and imagination that creates itself. The braiding of these energies begins in the Imaginal.

Lazaris said something else that intrigued me. He said that the Imaginal is the receptacle to gather, hold, and release the creativity and imagination of God/Goddess/All That Is. Isn't a creativity that imagines and creates itself and an imagination that creates and imagines itself coming close to what God's imagination and creativity might be about? And I think the current that can bring us Home ... all the way Home has do to with creativity, imagination, and love. Add God's love; add Goddess' love; and add the love of All That Is to imagination and creativity. A mixture that is a complexity of energy and force lifting to a higher octave of energy and force. The current that can carry us Home.

Now, having written all that, I also know this description is woefully short of the truth. [s]

Q: Happy New Year, Jach. Would you talk about how you work with your passion and creativity? I am particularly interested in the beginning times of a project or creative endeavor and getting started, though anything on the subject is appreciated. Thank you.

Jach:  Hi there. How nice to hear from you.[s] I wish I could ... I wish I could talk of and understand better how I work with these things. I will give it a go.

First, I resist. [vbg] Really, in so many ways, I am reluctant to change, and I resist change. As much as I do it, it is not something I approach with eagerness. I resist; sometimes I fight it. And there are the times that I plow right into self-pity. I can whine a lot about change ... "Oh no, not again!!!!"

Now, this happens when it becomes apparent that change is necessary and when it seems to come about randomly or by chance. It also happens when I consciously pursue change. Yeah, I know. It's weird. I can be going along just fine, and then I realize ... I am bored or restless. I can wake up feeling an uneasiness, and I know that I need to make some changes. That is, I know that I need to begin something new ... a new project. It's not a necessity, and it isn't random, but I know I have to do it. And then I resist ... "Oh, no, there I go again." I can get angry at myself.
But once I move into the resistance, be it pity or anger, I tend to move through it quickly. And then I can find focus. Once over the hump, then the creativity can awaken, and then the passion can begin to flow.

I used to have a much harder time with passion. I could never quite define it. But in the more recent workshop on passion, Lazaris said something that cleared this up for me and it's been much easier to work with my passion ever since. He pointed out that our passion is not really in a thing or an activity or an event. It's in us. The particular activity that we label "our passion" is not really our passion; it is the thing that can trigger it in us. That thing or those events are like matches. They can ignite the passion, but they are not the passion. I don't know, but that made sense to me and cleared the way. I stopped "looking for my passion" and just started letting it find me. [s] Beauty stirs my passion. Beauty in sound, beauty in motion or movement, beauty in a moment ... beauty triggers the passion that is inside me. It also really engages my soul. Tears fill my eyes a lot when I experience beauty ... that love that weeps at the slightest act of injustice or inhumanity and yet rejoices at the slightest act of human kindness ... yeah, beauty triggers my passion and engages my soul. So I resist, and then I move beyond it. Okay. Then I look for the beauty. And my eyes tear up. [s]

Then I am inspired, and I get to work. I ride the wave of those tears and that deep appreciation of beauty. And I come to exclaim the beauty of my own "movement" in creating as I think about ideas or as I write about experiences. And in the exclamation (!) the passion and the creativity are wedded.

And then I get out of the way. In the end I am most often incredulous and then mightily pleased with what comes out of it all. And I love the mystery of it all. I find immense beauty in mystery. I am surprised by how much beauty I find in mystery. I don't know if that helps, but that is what happens at the beginning for me when I think about passion and creativity. Thanks for asking.

Q: Hello, Jach. On the recording "2002: The Year of Creation and Manifestation" Lazaris talks about the *Hidden Face of Creation* or the face between the solid faces and the fluid faces. He says it is in this face that we will find the alliance we seek. Can you share with us what you do to better understand this lost or hidden face?

Jach: Boy, I wish I could. I haven't thought about that lately, but from time to time over the past few months I have wondered about that, too.

There are the solid faces of creation that are most often born of necessity. To produce something new out of what has been or to create new formation (or reformation) generally is a product of necessity, isn't it? Chance sometimes plays a role, but most often those solid faces ... the ones that look to create (and manifest) something new, something different, out of what currently exists ... deal with necessity.

Frankly, the fluid faces intrigue me much more: originating, inventing, innovating. They are also born of necessity, but they can also be the product of chance. While the solid faces most often come from necessity, the fluid faces can emerge from either necessity or chance, and I think they can do so randomly so that neither necessity nor chance has a statistical advantage. [s] Â I could be wrong about that.

Okay. Somewhere between the solid and fluid faces of creation, there is another face ... the hidden face ... the lost face ... the mysterious face. I haven't the foggiest idea of what that is. But then the year is not yet half over. There's time. [s] I suspect that it can be born of necessity or chance. I also strongly suspect that it seldom is. I think it is born of something else. As I type that, it occurs to me: I think it is born of something Other (read: something Other or something that emerges from the worlds of Other). Sure, we could happen upon it by chance; sure, it could serendipitously emerge from necessity, but I think if we are going to find that hidden face, we had better plan on looking other places (pun intended)[s].

I also think that mystery will play a major role in finding that hidden face. And while I am at it, it seems that the energy "between" will be intimately involved. When I think of the energies of mystery and of the "between," the word "miraculous" comes to mind. I think that if we are going to find that lost face of creation, we need to set our observing and measuring devices upon the Other and upon the mystery we find there. Within that mystery found in Other ... within the mystical or esoteric of the Other and its mystery, we can open to the possibility of miracles. We can enter the resonance of miracles. And if we do that, I suspect we will encounter that face of creation.

Will we recognize it? No. I don't think we will recognize it as such. It will come as a "stranger's face," I think, because it has been hidden for so long. But no matter, I think we will find it there. And I think it won't come out of necessity and it certainly will not be by chance, especially if we consciously and actively go looking for it. But when we find it, even though we won't realize that we have, the nature of our creation and manifestation will change. We can still use the solid faces and we can still utilize the fluid faces, but when we encounter the hidden face, the nature of our creation and the stuff we create will be different.

Perhaps that is how we will know we have found the lost face ... not because we recognize it, but because the grace of our creation/manifestation is different. "Who was that masked man/woman?" That may be the first question. In retrospect, the grace of creation is different and then we will retrace our steps, attempting to remember (re-member) where we went and what we found there. Then the recognition will come. And then the realization.

And I think back to what Lazaris said of such: That is where we will master the art of creation and manifestation. I conclude this by going back to where I began: Can I tell you about the hidden face of creation? I wish I could. At this point, I can only speculate. [s] Thanks for asking.

 

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Beauty and Magic

Saturday, December 19, 2015
Blog: Beauty and Magic

Q & A with Jach

Q. What is the relationship between Beauty and Healing? Perhaps it's obvious, but I've noticed lately ... as I've been touched by it, it seems to bring me to remembering the love.
JACH: There is a strong connection between beauty and healing, I think ... But I don't think it is immediately obvious. When I think of what you ask, I think about what Lazaris has said about what beauty can do in our lives.

First, it can open us up to our sense of immortality and our sense of eternity. With that resonance -- the resonance of being immortal and eternal -- we can create an environment that is conducive to healing, don't you think? I mean, there is a lot of hope and a high level of expectation in that resonance, and so much of healing hinges on hope and expectation.

Further, beauty allows our desires and our needs to become splendid. To me that means that our desires and needs, no matter how mundane or esoteric, take on a glow: They become shining in the grandest meaning of the word. Again, in the shining of beauty, our desire for healing and our need for healing take on a new life and a new energy, I think.

And one more: Not only does beauty fuel the truth that Goodness and Truth Shall Prevail, it also generates a state of renewal and revitalization; it generates and sustains a state of healing. Personally, I think the enchantment of beauty gives us both pause and a reason to begin again. Out of all this, I think there is a strong connection between beauty and healing.

Q. I feel there is a connection between the Beautiful Unknown and experiencing easy miracles -- and letting go of struggle. What can you say about the Unknown and beauty and miracles?

JACH: Well, Lazaris talks of the Beautiful Unknown. There is a powerful and everlasting connection between the two. [g]

For me, the beautiful Unknown is very akin to the Imaginal Realm or perhaps it is the Imaginal Realm that is akin ... [g] And as I work episodically in the Imaginal or the Beautiful Unknown, several things happen around struggle:

First, I find that alternative means present themselves in the Unknown. I remember Lazaris saying that there are as many solutions as there are steps to getting there. If there are five steps to reaching a goal, then there are at least five different ways to get there. Or there are at least five different solutions to the issue.

Using that, when I go into the Unknown, I open to the various solutions or means toward the end I seek. Some of those ways are known to me. Often those that are known are also ways of struggle. There are some ways or means to the solution or goal that are unknown to me. I bet those that are unknown to me probably do not involve struggle. [g]

So first, I find that when I seek the alternative means or solutions, I can find them and that they can be innovative and inventive ... always that means without struggle. Now when I say that, I do not mean without effort, and I do not mean without work, but I suppose you were aware of that. [g]

Second, while in the Unknown, it can offer us so much that would otherwise stand in my way. There are still entanglements that get in the way of success. But rather than processing them through from the start or from scratch, in the Unknown I can offer them up for healing. This comes with experience and with having done the work already. But when we have done the work and have the authority -- the authorship -- of our reality, then we can give ourselves the permission -- I am talking about empowerment here -- to offer up our entanglements rather than having to work through them one more time. That offering up, for me, works best in the Unknown. And the Beautiful Unknown as distinct from the Silent and the Sacred Unknown is where that happens for me.

Lazaris talks of how with beauty our unconscious can enter our conscious states with elegance and ease. In the presence of beauty, our Dark Shadow can integrate with our Light Shadow and both as one can integrate with us. In all this, it would be hard to justify struggle. [g]

So, the Beautiful Unknown can hold incredible keys to success, magic, and miracles.

Q. Is it not magic when I see Beauty, and is it not beauty when I experience Magic? What do you think of this?

JACH: I like what you say of beauty and magic. Often it is true. When we see beauty ... I would say that when we allow ourselves to experience beauty ... then it can truly be a magical moment. I say "allow ourselves to experience," because I think the power of beauty ... the mystery and the mysticism of beauty which is its magic … come from somewhere beyond seeing. Lazaris has often said that any of us can see something that is beautiful, but not all of us can reap the bounty of beauty. Not all of us can experience the richness of the gifts of beauty. To do that, I think we must reach beyond seeing. You may well have meant what I am saying. I know that English is not your first language. [g]

But when we will lift beyond our familiar senses and experience beauty, then I think we can receive her gifts. When we will stop and let beauty have her way with us, then we can sense the life and the light that can change us forever. Then we can hear the voice and our hearts can silently weep. When we will reach beyond and surrender a bit of our time and space to beauty, I think we can be wrapped and enraptured in her warmth and "never be cold" again. I think there is a substance to beauty that can move us in ways that "distance" has no meaning. Then beauty is magical.

And then to magic ... I think much of magic can be beautiful. And some magic just isn't that pretty. [g] There is some gutsy and "down and dirty" magic that is still very positive and wonderful, but I would be hard pressed to call it beautiful. [g] Remember … magic is changing reality in compliance with our will. It can be beautiful, but that is not a requirement. [g]

And there is magic that can catch our breath with its beauty. There is magic that is Soul Magic ... at least that is what I call it ... and it is inspiring and uplifting and transcendent. [g] That kind of magic is beautiful.

I also find the magic that I work with intensity and intimacy is a beautiful magic for me. It is a private magic. I don't do it in front of anyone, but alone and in the stillness of the night. This magic ... my magic of intensity and intimacy ... is a beautiful magic to me.

So the statement you make is true or can be true if we are conscious and if we are willing. But I would not rely upon it too strongly. It could lead to complacency or to the doldrums of assumption. [g] I hope this helps.

Q. Any suggestions for using crystals to explore Beauty? [g]

JACH: You know, I just put together the flier for the October workshop on crystals here in Orlando [a past event]. Lazaris described briefly the first stages of one of the "Adventures into the Incredible" that we will be doing then. He described holding our crystal ... whether it was an old companion or a new found friend, it is a dear crystal. We touch it in the ways Lazaris has just instructed us. We whisper the words, he says, the words that we just learned from Lazaris. And suddenly we are standing upon that reflective message plate or within that glimmer veil. We intone the sounds Lazaris taught us and we are on our way ...

For me, talking with and working with my crystals can open me to beauty. They are gateways. Whether that is their particular expertise or not, any crystal can transport and teleport us. In October [ refers to a past event] many of us are going to learn more about this than we can yet imagine, I think. But before that, any crystal can transport us. And beauty is one of its methods, I think.

Also, as we all know, crystals amplify, and they communicate as well as carry communication. They don't do this as we humans might. They have their own way. I think they sing. [g] I think there is a tonation and an interplay of undertones and overtones as well as the tones themselves. I think they sing. As we can touch a bit of that, we are struck by their beauty, and we are changed by a deeper sense of beauty herself. That's the way it seems to me. [g]

Q. Would you talk about how you work with your passion and creativity? I am particularly interested in the beginning times of a project or creative endeavor and getting started, though anything on the subject is appreciated. Thank you.

JACH:  I wish I could ... I wish I could talk of and understand better how I work with these things. I will give it a go.

First, I resist. [vbg] Really, in so many ways, I am reluctant to change, and I resist change. As much as I do it, it is not something I approach with eagerness. I resist; sometimes I fight it. And there are the times that I plow right into self-pity. I can whine a lot about change ... "Oh no, not again!!!!"

Now, this happens when it becomes apparent that change is necessary and when it seems to come about randomly or by chance. It also happens when I consciously pursue change. Yeah, I know. It's weird. I can be going along just fine, and then I realize ... I am bored or restless. I can wake up feeling an uneasiness, and I know that I need to make some changes. That is, I know that I need to begin something new ... a new project. It's not a necessity, and it isn't random, but I know I have to do it. And then I resist ... "Oh, no, there I go again." I can get angry at myself.

But once I move into the resistance, be it pity or anger, I tend to move through it quickly. And then I can find focus. Once over the hump, then the creativity can awaken, and then the passion can begin to flow.

I used to have a much harder time with passion. I could never quite define it. But in the more recent workshop on passion, Lazaris said something that cleared this up for me and it's been much easier to work with my passion ever since. He pointed out that our passion is not really in a thing or an activity or an event. It's in us. The particular activity that we label "our passion" is not really our passion; it is the thing that can trigger it in us. That thing or those events are like matches. They can ignite the passion, but they are not the passion. I don't know, but that made sense to me and cleared the way. I stopped "looking for my passion" and just started letting it find me. [s]

Beauty stirs my passion. Beauty in sound, beauty in motion or movement, beauty in a moment ... beauty triggers the passion that is inside me. It also really engages my soul. Tears fill my eyes a lot when I experience beauty ... that love that weeps at the slightest act of injustice or inhumanity and yet rejoices at the slightest act of human kindness ... yeah, beauty triggers my passion and engages my soul. So I resist, and then I move beyond it. Okay. Then I look for the beauty. And my eyes tear up. [s]

Then I am inspired, and I get to work. I ride the wave of those tears and that deep appreciation of beauty. And I come to exclaim the beauty of my own "movement" in creating as I think about ideas or as I write about experiences. And in the exclamation (!) the passion and the creativity are wedded.

And then I get out of the way. In the end I am most often incredulous and then mightily pleased with what comes out of it all. And I love the mystery of it all. I find immense beauty in mystery. I am surprised by how much beauty I find in mystery.

 

The above questions & answers are a a grouping of questions with Jach's replies from the Online Conferences

 

 

 



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